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NEWS
NEWSLETTER: APRIL 2011 Digital Papyrus newsletter

Digital Papyrus

"Science Fiction Brewed Fresh Daily"

Date: April 2011
Issue No. 84

Precursor

   Most of the cyberpunk i've encountered has a pretty dark undercurrent, but I still find it a fascinating look at what could be. As rapidly as technology is evolving, as erratically as our modern economy runs a lot of cyberpunk seems to be a logical conclusion. Maybe I keep reading it as cautionary fiction?

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New SF books for April 2011

Tor Books: Tor/Forge SF and Fantasy

THE UNINCORPORATED WAR - Dani Kollin, Eytan Kollin
HYBRIDS - Whitley Strieber
AFTER THE GOLDEN AGE - Carrie Vaughn
THE UNREMEMBERED - Peter Orullian
HE WALKED AMONG US - Norman Spinrad
SHADOW CHASER - Alexey Pehov
ALL THE LIVES HE LED - Frederik Pohl
CLIMATE OF CHANGE - Piers Anthony
FIVE ODD HONORS - Jane Lindskold
ONE SECOND AFTER - William R. Forstchen
THE LEGIONS OF FIRE - David Drake
THE STAINLESS STEEL RAT RETURNS - Harry Harrison
DEAD SPACE: MARTYR - B.K. Evenson
AS YOU WISH - Gabi Stevens
THE HAMMER OF DARKNESS - L.E. Modesitt, Jr.

Baen Books: Science Fiction & Fantasy from Baen Books

1636: THE SAXON UPRISING - Eric Flint
THE AMAZON LEGION - Tom Kratman
FLANDRY'S LEGACY - Poul Anderson
LONGEYE - Sharon Lee, Steve Miller
VIEW FROM THE IMPERIUM - Jody Lynn Nye
EXODUS--THE ARK - Paul Chafe

See also:

Night Shade Books
Del Rey
Science Fiction - Penguin Group(USA)
Bantam Dell Publishing Group
Random House, Inc: Science Fiction and Fantasy

Author's/Artist's Corner

Heroes of Cyberspace: John Brunner

by Charles A. Gimon
for INFO NATION

"For all the claims one hears about the liberating impact of the data-net, the truth is that it's wished on most of us a brand-new reason for paranoia."

John Brunner, "The Shockwave Rider", 1975.

John Brunner contributed to the world's science fiction heritage for over forty years. Publishing his first novel at age 17 in 1951, he continued to put out traditional "hard" science fiction through the fifties and sixties. Among several dozen titles he produced, four stand out: "The Sheep Look Up", "The Jagged Orbit", "Stand on Zanzibar", and "The Shockwave Rider", all published between 1968 and 1975.

"Stand on Zanzibar", which won a Hugo award in 1968, moved Brunner out of deep-space adventures and into the near-future dystopias which were popular in the late sixties and early seventies (think of the films "Soylent Green" or "A Clockwork Orange"), and which prepared the way for the cyberpunk movement.
READ MORE

Movie & TV Buzz

20011.04.01

2011.04.15 2011.04.22 2011.04.29


NOTICE: For the time being we will be discontinuing FICTION CORNER

Con news

Conventions for April 2011:

2011.04.01-03    WONDERCON 2011    San Francisco, CA
2011.04.08-10    DIMENSION JUMP XVI - RED DWARF    Birmingham, UK
2011.04.22-24    CONGLOMERATION    Louisville, KY
2011.04.29-05.01    DEMICON 22--HERE BE DRAGON!    Des Moines, IA


Your favourite convention not listed here?
go to O*W*C Resources Conventions Calendar for more!

SPACE BABEL - The latest in Science, NASA and Other Agencies

This Week at NASA

Top Stories listed today on Spaceflight Now

MESSENGER probe enters orbit around Mercury

DR EMILY BALDWIN, ASTRONOMY NOW

After a 6.5 year journey around the inner Solar System, the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranger spacecraft, MESSENGER, has become the first to ever enter orbit around innermost planet Mercury

After a period of systems checking, on 4 April its suite of instruments, including imaging cameras, spectrometers, a magnetometer and an altimeter, will be turned on and the science phase of the mission will commence. Throughout its one year nominal science mission, MESSENGER will orbit the planet once every 12 hours in order to glean information on Mercury's surface features, its magnetic field and exosphere.
FULL STORY

Decommissioning work starts for shuttle Discovery

JUSTIN RAY, SPACEFLIGHT NOW

And so it begins. Technicians at the Kennedy Space Center have begun taking apart the shuttle Discovery, the ship now a laboratory specimen for engineering forensics before her future date with a museum.

Inside orbiter hangar No. 2 last week, the shuttle's nose piece containing the control thrusters used to maneuver the spacecraft was removed and taken to the hypergolic maintenance facility for decommissioning.

It's the first visible sign of critical post-flight safing work now underway on the three-decade-old Discovery as she goes into retirement.
FULL STORY

From Space.com

NASA Opens New Rocket Facility in Virginia

Mike Wall, SPACE.com Senior Writer

NASA has unveiled a new facility to help ready commercial rockets for launch, and the first work at the new site should begin this month in preparation for a test flight to the International Space Station later this year.

The space agency held a ribbon-cutting ceremony yesterday (March 22) attended by bigwigs such as NASA Administrator Charles Bolden and Sen. Barbara Mikulski, D-Md. to christen the new Horizontal Integration Facility (HIF) at its Wallops Flight Facility on Wallops Island, Va.
READ MORE

Weird Saturn Radio Signals Puzzle Astronomers

SPACE.com Staff

Saturn is sending astronomers mixed signals radio signals, that is.

NASA's Cassini spacecraft recently found that the natural radio wave signals coming from the giant planet differ in the northern and southern hemispheres, a split that can affect how scientists measure the length of a Saturn day. But the weirdness doesn't stop there, researchers say.

The signal variations which are controlled by the planet's rotation also change dramatically over time, apparently in sync with the Saturnian seasons.
READ MORE


And, of course, don't forget to check out our very own Blog:
http://www.other-worlds-cafe.com/news/blog/

A short break from gravity

Mario Kart is one of the silliest console games around, but everyone seems to enjoy it. Here's a video from FreddieW inspired by the game:

Hook in the Book

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY

Take 'em an inch and they'll give you a hell.

DATA-RETRIVIAL MODE

  The man in the bare steel chair was was as naked as the room's whire walls. They had shaved his head and body completely; only his eyelashes remained. Tiny adhesive pads held sensors in position at a dozen places on his scalp, at each side of his mouth, on his throat, over his heart and over his solar plexis and at every najor ganglion down to his ankles.

  From each sensor a lead, fine as gossamer, ran to the sole object--apart from the steel chair and two other chairs, both softly padded--that might be said to furnish the room. That was a data-analysis console about two meters broad by a meter and a half high, with display screens and signal lights on its slanted top, convenient to one of the padded chairs.

The Shockwave Rider
John Brunner

Last Word

   Most speculative fiction has an element of truth underlying the tale. Fantasy has characterixations that lend their truth to the "impossible"; science fiction has bare science (sometimes very bare) that lends possibilities to our "real" world. It's easier for me to suspend my disbelief when reading science fiction, especially when it's filled with hard science, but I do enjoy a well-written story of magic and magical creatures. I do LOVE those dragons!

   Who needs reality all the time, anyway?

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